UW Pipeline Project

Dawn Tuason

“ASB allowed children to have a voice, adults to hear those voices and lend resources, and communities to show each other what their homes and journeys were all about.”

Which community did you volunteer at, and what did you work on while you were there?

 I went to Forks, WA   and worked with 3rd-5th graders on exploring what their dreams were through a literacy arts project. Then I did a documentary alongside a group of talented colleagues with the powerful 5th graders of Neah Bay, WA about their Native American culture and what it meant to them and their families.  Both places were incredible, vibrant communities filled with their own rich histories!

How has being a part of ASB impacted your goals and dreams for the future?

Before ASB, I planned to be a nurse and now I am an early childhood special educator and early interventionist, working with the smallest of populations and supporting families in having access to early intervention services. ASB allowed children to have a voice, adults to hear those voices and lend resources, and communities to show each other what their homes and journeys were all about. As an educator, I am encouraged to offer safe spaces for children to be heard, for adults to learn, and communities to grow together just as we did during Spring break!

What is a favorite memory you have during your time with ASB?

I have two! Climbing an actual mountain in the pouring rain, with my ASB group and helping each other reach the top (while losing a shoe!) and walking home in the mud and being invited to sacred spaces and ceremonies by generous hosts. Gaining trust and building relationships with community members is such an integral part of future work spaces, ASB taught me this truth and I’m forever grateful to be practicing it now as a professional!

 

Interested in being apart of the 2018 Literacy Arts Alternative Spring Break? Apply now!