UW Pipeline Project

Abigail Sloan

“I think many students come into the university with these grandiose goals to change the world, sometimes forgetting about the small human-to-human relationships that these large changes need to be rooted in.”

Which community did you volunteer at, and what did you work on while you were there?

I was a volunteer my first year in Harrah and a team leader volunteer the following year in Tonasket. Both years I was working on ASB’s Literacy through Writing program, with my first year’s theme being “There’s No Place Like Home” and my second year’s theme being “Compassion”.

How has being a part of ASB impacted your goals and dreams for the future?

I have told many friends, teachers, and unsolicited strangers that ASB has easily been one of the best experiences I have had during my time at the University of Washington. I think many students come into the university with these grandiose goals to change the world, sometimes forgetting about the small human-to-human relationships that these large changes need to be rooted in. Alternative Spring Break has been grounding and humbling, reminding me of the Native children like me that I want to be able to be a positive role-model for in all my future career goals, whether that ends up being a career in teaching or the arts.

What is a favorite memory you have during your time with ASB?

My favorite memory during ASB has to do a lot with support and camaraderie I have found in this program. During my team’s last night in Tonasket, we were invited to the house of one of the teachers for dinner. Even though we were essentially strangers at the beginning of the week, coming from all different backgrounds, at that moment, none of that seemed to matter as we gathered around the table to share genuine laughter, conversations, and friendship.

Interested in being apart of the 2018 Literacy Arts Alternative Spring Break? Applications open Monday, November 13th!