Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards

The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation is a federal agency providing programs to promote leadership, education, collaboration, and conflict resolution in the areas of environment, public lands, and natural resources in order to strengthen Native nations, assist federal agencies and others to resolve environmental conflicts, and to encourage the continued use and appreciation of our nation’s rich resources.

The Udall Foundation awards scholarships to college sophomores and juniors for leadership, public service, and commitment to issues related to American Indian nations or to the environment. Each year, the Udall Foundation awards approximately 50 scholarships of up to $7,000 each, and anticipates that at least 20 scholarships will be awarded in Tribal Public Policy and Native Health Care. The Udall scholarship honors the legacies of Morris Udall and Stewart Udall, whose careers had a significant impact on American Indian self-governance, health care, and the stewardship of public lands and natural resources.

Learn more about the Udall Scholarships and UW application process.

Read about UW’s 2018 Udall Scholars Alishia Orloff and Ashley Lewis.

2019 - 2020 Scholars & Nominees

Sierra Campbell, Scholar

Junior, Education, Communities, & Organizations, Environment Studies minor

As a member of the Apsaalooke Nation, Sierra hopes to use her career to support Native American youth. Sierra hopes to make the STEM field more inclusive for Indigenous scholars while supporting holistic wellbeing along the way. Sierra’s studies are focused under the College of Education and the College of the Environment. These areas of study have allowed Sierra to develop crucial skills that are needed in order to work with the environment and communities.
Sierra’s tips for future applicants:Meet with Emily Smith!


Ammara Touch, Nominee

Junior, Biology & American Ethnic Studies, Diversity minor

Ammara is a third-year student majoring in Biology and American Ethnic Studies. As an activist, ecologist and educator, she is interested in the relationship between humans and the environment, particularly with how ecocide, ethnocide and genocide all intersect, and how systems of oppression capitalize on the environment’s destruction to exploit folks of color. Her identity as a Khmer American womxn and child of refugees in the diaspora allowed her to link the healing of communities to the healing of the earth, seeing trauma rooted in colonialism and U.S. imperialism. Her dream to be the first in her family to earn a PhD and become a professor who will decolonize western views of science as well as the colonial narratives that have erased communities of color is inspired by her own journey of challenging silences and find power in truth. She recognizes education as a site of transformation, and seeks to cultivate change-makers who will advocate for bio-cultural conservation, climate justice, and environmental justice with the intimate understanding that culture is inextricably tied to the ways people live with the earth. Ammara is currently a Doris Duke Conservation Scholar, a member of the HilleRisLambers plant community ecology lab, and is engaged in work centering storytelling in the Khmer community as an organizer. As someone who identifies as an activist and uses various creative mediums to advocate for relevant social issues, she highlights storytelling as a way to humanize, rewrite histories, and reclaim agency through the legacies of trauma.

Ammara’s tips for future applicants: An opportunity not taken is an opportunity lost; just by applying, your chances of getting a scholarship increase significantly! We tend to underestimate ourselves, but we are talented individuals with rich stories and experiences that should be shared with the world. Don’t let a large applicant pool deter you from applying.


Anya Gavrylko, Nominee

Sophomore, Environmental Studies major

Hi! My name is Anya Gavrylko and I am a sophomore majoring in Environmental Studies with a focus on urban planning, environmental justice, and community empowerment. I want to help create cities that align the natural and built environment in a sustainable and equitable way. Issues that I am most passionate about are mitigating negative effects of the climate crisis in vulnerable communities, ensuring universal food sovereignty, making public transportation universally accessible, universal affordable housing, and restoring native pollinator habitats. If there was one message I could relay to all people it would be that environmental progress and social progress and interwoven, and there will never be true progress unless issues in both of these movements are addressed mutually. With throw away people, you are guaranteed to have a throw away planet; with a throw away planet, you are guaranteed to have throw away people.

Anya’s tips for future applicants: Remember that those who are looking over your application may look over your responses for 5-10 minutes, maybe a little more, maybe a little less. Really focus on making sure the reader can sense your passion and dedication, even after a quick read through! Also, use the scholarship advisors, they are there for you and are super helpful and encouraging!


Emily Poulin, Nominee

Junior, Marine Biology & Biology (Physiology)

My name is Emily Poulin, and I am a junior at the University of Washington. I am double majoring in marine biology and physiology. After completing my degrees in the spring of 2021, I am planning to attend graduate school to study marine invertebrate physiology. I am especially interested in investigating how climate change and ocean acidification are altering the physiological processes of marine invertebrates.


Rose Schoenfeld, Nominee

Sophomore, Atmospheric Sciences major, Applied Mathematics minor

I am pursuing a degree in Atmospheric Science with a concentration in Meteorology at the University of Washington, where I am developing skills in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and computer science. I am preparing for a career in meteorology and climate science. I want to contribute to the data collection and analysis that yield knowledge to help protect the natural world. After I graduate in 2022, I will welcome the opportunity to continue my education and attend graduate school and earning a master’s degree in Atmospheric Science.


Autumn Forespring, Nominee

Junior, Environmental Science & Resource Management



History of UW's Undergraduate Nominees, and Scholars

2018 - 2019

Cecilia Hoffman, Scholar

Junior, Education, Communities & Organizations major

I grew up on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation- it is the tribe in which I am enrolled. Additionally, my family line also connects with the Nez Perce tribe and the Ojibwe bands of Canada. I am currently earning a degree that specializes in education; over time I have come to value education with significant importance. That being said, I am unsure of what my future career paths will be. I am interested in policy- specifically of the tribal and educational varieties. But I also contain great interests in environmental justice, public health, and other forms of organizational change. Throughout my high school and college years thus far, I have been involved in numerous activities that I believe have contributed to holding a diverse perspective on the world. I intend to continue working with these organizations and communities that I am in, and also expand upon different experiences in order to contribute to the change that I want to see in this world. Most importantly, I intend that with whatever I learn, accomplish, etc. I will always remind myself to think about the communities that I come from, and how this knowledge can be used to help advance ourselves.

Cecilia’s tips for future applicants: Reach out to the scholarship advisors, take advantages of the resources you have here, and be yourself/tell your own story wholeheartedly.


Helen Ganahl, Scholar

Junior, Community, Environment & Planning

Helen Ganahl

Helen is a Community, Environment, and Planning major at the University of Washington. Her self-guided, interdisciplinary degree draws from the sustainable agriculture, ecological restoration, and urban planning fields. Turning her focus towards the modification of landscapes- to shape shared environmental and social-scapes- she has determined that, in the era of climate change, equitable and ecological city planning will lead to more resilient communities. To these ends, she plans to attend graduate school for landscape architecture or urban planning. Currently, you can find her volunteering with urban farming and social justice organizations, revitalizing the UW farm permaculture site, researching penitentiary gardens and decreased recidivism, backyard gardening, and building strong community relationships (…and doing lots of homework)


Xavaar Quaranto, Nominee

Biology and History major


2017 - 2018

Tiara Adler, Nominee

Junior, Environmental Studies and Spanish major

Tiara Adler

I am a junior double majoring in Environmental Studies and Spanish. I was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest which has influenced much of who I am and what I am passionate about. Love of the natural world was instilled in me at a young age through backpacking, camping, skiing, and swimming. Through my academics, my understanding of our environmental challenges has transformed into a desire to create solutions. This coupled with my passion for global social justice has given me an intersectional lens to act upon.

As a freshman, I continued my prior involvement with suicide prevention through Huskies for Suicide Prevention and Awareness (HSPA), where I have educated our community and advocated for mental health policies on state and local levels. This grew my interest of policy and its connection to the environment, which led me to a Climate Change internship at the Sierra Club, where I worked on grassroots campaigns against coal and oil transport in Seattle. This year, I am working at a Co-Manager of the ASUW Student Food Cooperative. Our mission is to create a culture of sustainability surrounding food through tackling food insecurity, and creating access to sustainable, local, and ethical food. Outside of the classroom, I am a farmer, play on the UW Women’s Water Polo Club, and love to get outside.

After graduation, I see myself pursuing graduate research in urban and environmental planning. I hope to investigate the intersection between development, protection, and usage of land. As human populations are becoming increasingly urbanized, challenges surrounding ecological preservation are growing. Cities are beautiful part of our world; they are full of culture, diversity and the hustle and bustle of human life. However, their innate isolation from natural wilderness perpetuates the belief that our species is separate from nature. Our day-to-day lives allow us to benefit from the Earth’s resources without thinking critically about this impact. I believe that through pursuing higher academia, I will be able to begin to understand more deeply the underpinnings of this philosophy.


Rachel Fricke, Nominee

Junior, Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and Environmental Studies major

Rachel Fricke

A lifelong affection for freshwater and the organisms it plays home to has motivated Rachel to pursue studies in aquatic sciences and environmental policy. As a Spokane, WA native, she grew up with a keen awareness of how the Northwest’s lakes, rivers, and streams provide habitat for diverse life as well as essential services to human societies. She is fascinated by both aquatic ecosystems and the policies and legal framework which dictate their use, and aims to bridge boundaries between these two disciplines in all of her pursuits.

This past summer Rachel worked in Senegal for six weeks as a field technician for the Upstream Alliance, a group reducing schistosomiasis infection in the Senegal River basin by reintroducing native prawns whose migration upstream has been impeded by a dam. Since returning, she continues to synthesize water resource management and public health in the Wood Lab by researching the encystment behavior of another waterborne parasite, Fasciola sp. Additionally, she is currently working in the Olden Lab to analyze a dataset on angler movement from NetFish’s sonar-enabled iBobber and compare trends in recreational fishing traffic with frequently-used invasive species pathways.

On campus, Rachel is co-leading a collaborative effort to publish the UW’s first print and digital environmental outreach journal, FieldNotes. The journal will feature news articles and research synopses on environmental work being conducted by the UW and local organizations throughout Puget Sound, and all entries are written, photographed, edited, and designed by undergraduates. She also serves as Director of Sponsorship for the all-women’s outdoor group Northwest Women, and strives to outreach to prospective students and community members beyond the UW fold as a Student Ambassador for the College of the Environment. Ultimately, she will pursue employment within academia, an administrative agency, or non-profit with the goal of bringing together diverse stakeholders in service of our freshwater resources.


Ashley Lewis, Scholar

Junior, Aquatic & Fishery Sciences major

Ashley Lewis

I am, and always will be, an advocate for the great outdoors. Fishing and hiking on the Olympic Peninsula is where you can find me outside of the classroom. As a fishing guide, sharing my passion with others has taught me much about needs of our outdoor spaces. My experiences as a fishing guide helped me see that I wanted to make a greater impact than on one river, so I returned to higher education. As a student, my goal is to continue my education on through an M.S. of Aquatic Fisheries Science at the University of Washington. Professionally, I want to work in policy to help strengthen Pacific Northwest fisheries. Through outreach and advocacy, I want to educate people in outdoor recreation while showing them that investing in outdoor spaces benefits us all. I want to show that leaders can even come as female Native American fishing guides.


Alishia Orloff, Scholar

Junior, Environmental Science & Resource Management major

Alishia Orloff

Alishia Orloff is an undergraduate researcher currently obtaining her B.S. in Environmental Science and Resource Management at the University of Washington. She has a strong interest in terrestrial and riparian. She is heavily affiliated with research regarding hydrologic landscape patterns and wildlife management. Captivated by the interdisciplinary processes of our ecosystems, Alishia endeavors to use her understanding of our world to better the relationship between people and their lands. Headed for her doctorate degree, she aspires to become a top researcher in an ecological organization that shares the same motives to preserve our resources through proactive efforts in community engagement.


Ben Weymiller, Nominee

Junior, Business Administration and Chinese Studies major

Ben Weymiller

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, Ben was born with a strong sense of environmental stewardship, pushing him to pursue a career in renewable energy implementation. Over the past 7 years, he has studied Chinese, a pursuit which has already taken him to China twice. In his travels, Ben has grown an interest in combining his passions for Chinese and the environment to help build a culture of environmental awareness in the US and China alike. Looking beyond government-funded environmental protection efforts, Ben wishes to help build and spread a business case and passion for creating more fiscally and morally sound sustainable business practices. To help him achieve his career path, Ben is pursuing a double degree in Chinese and Business Administration, focusing in Operations and Supply Chain Management, and receiving a Certificate of International Studies in Business in China. Outside of the classroom, Ben has been involved with Green Greek Eco-Reps to help reduce the UW Greek Community’s environmental impact, and UW solar, an organization testing, researching, and implementing solar projects on the Seattle UW campus and the Greater Seattle Area. To enrich his understanding of both the business and environmental work environments, Ben has worked as an environmental conservation outreach associate with Seattle City Light and Puget Sound Energy, and as a global sourcing coordinator for a large merchandising company. Ultimately, Ben would love to combine his knowledge of the Business world with his passions for Chinese and the environment. Ben’s ultimate goal is to help both the US and China to become the two global leaders in fighting to create a cleaner, brighter, and healthier future for all those who will come after us.

2016 - 2017

Madison Bristol, Nominee

Sophomore, Environmental Science & Resource Management and Dance major

Madison Bristol

The unique relationship between the Earth and humanity has compelled me to be an interdisciplinary environmental problem solver. My mission is to learn and understand as much as possible about the world around me, to be an advocate for the environment and humanity, to create quality research, and to empower my community to act. My commitment to this goal is reflected by my continuous active engagement as a student of the environment at the University of Washington, and as a developing artist with a uniquely environmental perspective.

I intend to pursue a master’s degree and hopefully even a PhD in environmental science, where my thesis will likely reflect the implications of environmental change for humanity—especially in relation to coastal ecosystems. These large population centers will be dynamically affected by environmental change, and I am curious to explore this relationship through a scientific and cultural lens. Since my interests directly relate to the community I am a part of, I also value the potential of community engagement with science. I believe that making research accessible to the public is one key way to spur environmental advocacy. I am also attempting to expand the audience for environmental discourse through the means of dance, my lifelong art. I plan to remain connected to this world throughout my professional career and desire to utilize dance as a novel form of communication.

Outside of college in the environmental sphere, I look forward to joining a professional industry, organization, or agency that fosters scientific research, disseminates information and knowledge, and has the ability and willpower to create change. Regardless of what my journey may bring, I will be at my best when surrounded by motivated, interdisciplinary people like myself who have the desire to create tangible change, together.


Talia Haller, Nominee

Junior, Business Administration and International Studies major

Talia Haller

Talia Haller is a junior dedicated to tackling the climate change challenge. She hopes to make her mark by perpetuating the renewable energy revolution and promoting sustainable development. In 2014, Talia enrolled at the University of Washington to pursue a double major in Business Administration and International Studies with a focus on the environment.

As a freshman at the University of Washington, Tali jumped into campus sustainability efforts by volunteering for the Campus Sustainability Fund during her first quarter. Additionally, under the direct supervision of the President of the Puget Sound Association of Sigma Kappa, Talia had an integral role in the creation and development of an award winning pilot project implementing sustainable goals and initiatives at UW Sigma Kappa Sorority. The program has grown to national potential and has begun to develop objectives and goals for further national growth and development.

Tali’s passion about sustainability and environmental activism didn’t stop within her own sorority. Going above and beyond, Tali acted upon her exemplary vision to develop a Greek-wide sustainability project that also included collaboration with other sustainability-oriented UW entities (for example, the UW Farm, the UW Biodiesel Cooperative, and UW Solar). In 2015, Tali co-founded and has directed the Green Greek Representative Program (GGRP), a student run program working to make the UW Greek Community a more sustainable place.

After graduation, Talia plans to pursue graduate studies in Energy & Environmental policy. Ultimately, she wants to help promote clean energy, climate action and sustainable development in Latin America and other developing countries. She sees herself as the Leader of a Latin America team, such as those at Bloomberg New Energy Finance or the Natural Resources Defense Council, under which she can serve as the voice to corporations, media, public-policy leaders, and others, in regards to regional financial, economic and policy analysis.


Emily Menz, Nominee

Sophomore, Environmental Studies and Economics majors

Emily Menz

Through her studies of the Environment and Economics, Emily hopes to capitalize on the intersections between these two often contradictory fields and develop solutions for climate change that appeal economically to large corporations. From a young age, Emily loved exploring the Pacific Northwest by skiing, running, kayaking, and hiking with her family. This young love transformed into a sense of responsibility to our environment and by combining this with her interest in quantitative sciences and leadership she wants to dedicate her career toward tackling climate change.

Emily has shaped her Husky Experience to make the most of her undergraduate years. First, she serves as a student leader in the Honors program. In the fall, she worked as a Peer Educator teaching a class of incoming freshman where she facilitated discussions about climate change. In the spring, she works as a Peer Mentor – meeting with prospective UW Honors students and helping guide their college decision. Emily also plays trombone in the Husky Marching Band, plays on the UW Women’s Club Soccer team, and participates in the Green Greeks Representatives program working to make UW’s Greek Community more sustainable. This spring, she also interned with COASST – Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team – communicating with volunteers to monitor the marine ecosystems of beaches all along the west coast of the United States.

This summer she will be working as an outreach associate for 3 Degrees – a renewable energy firm partnering with Puget Sound Energy to spread renewable energy plans to residents in Seattle. Then in August she will leave to spend four months in Iceland conducting renewable energy research and studying the impacts of climate change on fragile Arctic ecosystems. After UW, Emily sees herself pursuing graduate research environmental economics and policy, working with sustainability and conservation non-profits, and helping lead environmental businesses to impact sustainability changes in the private sector. She sees our environmental crisis as one that requires dedication from professionals in all disciplines, and hopes to help ignite passion for solutions by bringing people together.


Nola Peshkin, Nominee

Sophomore, English major

Nola Peshkin

Born and raised in a family of avid outdoors enthusiasts, Nola Peshkin grew up surrounded by ideals of promoting conservation and practicing sustainable habits. She is currently pursuing a degree in English and French, and hopes to become a backcountry outdoor educator, as well as an author for the rhetoric of outdoor education. She was inspired her leaders and educators while spending time at Island Wood outdoor school on Bainbridge Island as a child, and during her month-long backcountry expedition with the National Outdoor Leadership School. Through reflective and immersive outdoor experiences, Nola helps to instill sustainable practices as the status quo for generations to come. While at UW Nola spends her free time as the Executive Director of the Students Expressing Environmental Dedication (SEED), working as a development intern at Hillel UW, hiking with Northwest Women, and racing on the Husky Ski Team.

2015 - 2016

Talia Haller, Nominee

Sophomore, Business Administration and International Studies major

Talia Haller

Talia Haller is a sophomore dedicated to tackling the climate change challenge. She hopes to make her mark by perpetuating the renewable energy revolution and promoting sustainable development. In 2014, Talia enrolled at the University of Washington to pursue a double major in Business Administration and International Studies with a focus on the environment.

As a freshman at the University of Washington, Talia jumped into campus sustainability efforts by volunteering for the Campus Sustainability Fund during her first quarter. Additionally, under the direct supervision of our President of the Puget Sound Association of Sigma Kappa Jaclynn Treat, Talia had an integral role in the creation and development of an award winning pilot project implementing sustainable goals and initiatives at UW Sigma Kappa Sorority. As the first ever Sustainability Chairwoman, her incredible ambition and enthusiasm enabled her to take on the challenging tasks of establishing goals, initiating programs and refining data with the intent to support the reduction of young women’s carbon emissions and the building’s energy use intensity. The program has grown to national potential, partnering with another chapter from Arizona State University, and has begun to develop objectives and goals for national growth and development (Learn more: Sigma Kappa’s Road to Sustainability).

Talia’s passion about sustainability and environmental activism didn’t stop within her own sorority. Going above and beyond this year, Talia acted upon her vision to develop a Greek-wide sustainability project that also included collaboration with other sustainability-oriented UW entities (for example, the UW Farm, the UW Biodiesel Cooperative, and UW Solar). Working with EcoReps, an RSO that helps students develop sustainable projects on campus, Talia helped launch and is now the Director of the Green Greek Representative Program (GGRP), a student run program working to make the UW Greek Community a more sustainable place. After graduation, Talia plans to pursue graduate studies in Energy & Environmental policy with an emphasis on International Security. Eventually, Talia wants to work in think tanks or the State Department where she can contribute to creating sustainable energy policies.

2014 - 2015

Feben Gebremichael, Nominee

Drama, Performance major


2013 - 2014

John McClung, Nominee

Anthropology major


2012 - 2013

Patricia Allen-Dick, Nominee

Social Welfare major


Corinna Tordillos, Nominee

Biochemistry and American Indian Studies majors


2011 - 2012

Sarah Boone, Nominee

Junior, International Studies major, Environmental Studies minor

Sarah Boone is a Junior in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, studying diplomacy and international relations. She also has a minor in environmental studies from the UW Program on the Environment. Her academic interests bridge these two fields of study as she focuses on issues of environmental degradation at the international level and how the global community can resolve the rising number of environmental conflicts. In particular she is interested in the management of fresh water resources around the world and the effect that issues of water quality and quantity have on international politics and security. This focus crystalized during her sophomore year, when she took the Jackson School course, “Water and Security in the Middle East.” Since then, she has studied water security issues around the world, producing several research papers on the subject which she presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in May. She is currently the editor of a research taskforce on environmental issues in Indonesia and is working on her senior thesis on water resource conflict in Oman.

Outside of classes, Sarah participates actively in a number of organizations. Sarah has taken on leadership roles within the Jackson School Journal of International Studies where she works as a senior editor, and within the Center for Learning and Undergraduate Enrichment, in which she taught weekly course review sessions for students in the entry-level Jackson School courses. These experiences have honed her leadership skills and increased her interest in taking on greater leadership roles in the future.

After finishing her undergraduate degree, Sarah intends to get a masters and possibly doctorate degree in water science, policy and management. She wants to become a leader in the field of global environmental politics, with the research skills and depth of knowledge needed to participate in scholarly dialogue at the highest level. Professionally, she would like to pursue work in environmental policy consulting within the agencies of the federal government. She believes that environmental justice is social justice, and that we must seek widespread policy reforms that honor and preserve the natural world.


William Franklin, Nominee

Junior, Art major

I grew up in Carmel, California, a small community of 5000 with its historic Spanish influence and its literary roots in Steinbeck’s Cannery Row and where the vast agricultural belt of the Salinas Valley joins the majestic Ventana wilderness. Growing up in this unique environmental culture, I developed a deep connection and respect for my natural surroundings. I learned quickly how precious and scare these resources are and how local citizens made a difference in protecting them. It may partly because of the how I was raised, in a house full of sharp wit and open opinions and by parents who advocated respect for the environment and social justice, but I never strayed from my connection to the natural world and the need to defend its safety. In my middle and high school years I discovered art (film, photography, music) as a voice for my environmental views. My family, teachers and community encouraged my exploration of these interests beyond the Central Coast, to a global awareness.

I believe that we each have a perspective of the world, which shapes our choices, motivates our actions, defines our ethics. For me the question is: how do I express mine? Over time my artistic styles and aesthetic has changed in search of this answer, but the passion remains the same.

What eventually led me to the field of design was a curiosity for problem solving and a recognition of the inherit power and beauty of this field. Every day we interact with something that has been designed – chairs, clothes, books, websites, parks, cities, schools. The design world, like our natural world, has become part of our global environment. My goal and my passion is to work towards lasting and sustainable solutions through the mediums of art and design.


Rachel Stubbs, Honorable Mention

Biology (Ecology, Evolution & Conservation) major


Johannah Verhulst, Nominee

Junior, Biology (Ecology, Evolution, Conservation) major, Environmental Studies minor

I grew up on small homestead on the Olympic Peninsula and spent large amounts of time outside as a child. I have loved spending time in nature for as long as I can remember, but it wasn’t until I got older and moved away that I realized how lucky I had been growing up with so many wild areas around me. Now I want to find ways to bring other people to wilderness or at least bring little bits of wilderness to them.

I also had many opportunities to help in my parents’ large garden and greenhouse. Now I volunteer on the UW Farm and have become deeply interested in our connection with food, agriculture and how those affect the ecosystems that we all inhabit.

It wasn’t until the last few years that I discovered a passion for teaching other people about our environment and how important it is to be conscious of our impact. I love working outside, and I love learning and teaching about all of the amazing interactions between plants and animals. I hope to continue hiking, swimming and discovering in natural areas both in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere. I want to work at either an environmental education center or outdoors introducing people to nature. In my free time, I want to continue gardening and educating people on the impacts of food and how we can be more thoughtful in our agricultural processes.

2010 - 2011

Anshika Suniti Kumar, Scholar

Junior, Environmental Studies and Economics major

My name is Anshika Kumar, and I am finishing my junior year at the University of Washington, pursuing degrees in Environmental Studies and Economics. I have been heavily involved in major environmental initiatives on campus, including being a founding member of the Campus Sustainability Fund. As I have grown increasingly passionate about food issues this year, I have also interned on the UW Farm and taken leadership roles in the burgeoning UW Student Food Cooperative. Although my interests in environmental studies are diverse, I am particularly interested in the way our economic system has come to inherently fuel environmentally and socially destructive behaviors.

In light of this, I want to gain a deeper understanding of the system and incentives that drive us to unsustainable ends, and to gain a more global perspective on economic systems employed around the world—from remote, smallscale villages, to industrialized capitalist nations—in order to seek out how we can construct a viable, global economy where values are inherently embedded in social and environmental welfare, and not simply profit maximization. In other words, I hope to address the problem of unsustainable economic systems, and explore ways to make them less so. But while part of me wants to look at the big picture, part of me also wants to get busy now. In this way, I have been growing increasingly passionate about food and working on food systems as a concrete, tangible, and extremely important way to begin addressing often overwhelming environmental issues of global scale. Sustainable agriculture offers systemic and behavior-changing solutions to several interconnected environmental and social issues. I see myself rigorously pursuing research in environmental economics, while simultaneously engaging in agrifood movements and the food system wherever I may end up. My academic programs, as well as my experiences on the UW Farm and with the UW Student Food Cooperative, will give me a strong foundation to pursue these questions, issues, and desires—beginning with graduate school.


Olga Kachook, Nominee

Junior, Business Administration major, Environmental Studies minor

I am currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, along with a minor in Environmental Studies. After earning this degree, I would like to work for a company as part of their sustainability effort committee, in a position such as Director of Sustainability or Sustainability Manager, or to do outside consulting work for firms in order to help them reach environmental goals. I would like to show companies the link between their current business models and resource depletion, pollution, and climate change, the profitability of environmentally-friendly initiatives and innovations, the growing trend of conscious consumers, and the long-term internal and external benefits that come with these changes. This work will meet the needs of the community by addressing the need to reduce the business eco-footprint and engage with others on global environmental issues. Because businesses greatly contribute to the waste products and carbon dioxide emissions that result in environmental issues, this will allow me to improve the carbon footprint of the community while also reducing the dependence on traditional energy methods. Through this work, I would be addressing the environmental impact of the polluting, high-impact business sector of the economy.

My current academic program will help me to achieve my professional goals because majoring in Business Administration will give me the educational background necessary for proposing changes in business models, while a minor in Environmental Studies will provide me with an understanding of how to reduce a company’s impact on the environment. After receiving my Bachelor’s I hope to continue working towards my educational goals by pursuing a Master of Business Administration in Sustainable Business at the University of Washington or Bainbridge Graduate Institute,. This degree would expand on my knowledge by bridging the work of both my major and minor, and enable me with the skills necessary to pursue my career goals.

2009 - 2010

Audrey Djunaedi, Scholar

Junior, Aquatic & Fishery Sciences and Applied Music major


Geoffrey Morgan, Scholar

Junior, Civil & Environmental Engineering and International Studies major

I was born and raised on a farm in a small town outside of Seattle called Hobart. There I completed all k-12 scholastic levels in the local school district and graduated with high honors in June 2005 from Tahoma Senior High. After graduating I came to the Honors College at the University of Washington to pursue a degree in Aerospace Engineering. One year into the program I realized that building rockets and spaceships was not going to keep me fulfilled for the rest of my life. I wanted to get out, explore, and help people around the world. To do this I decided to major in Civil and Environmental Engineering and International Studies.

In my third year I decided to study abroad in Chengdu, China. While in China I conducted an independent undergraduate research project in two Yi minority villages on the recent NGO water projects that had been built. I analyzed them to see the effects they had on the villagers’ way of life. I also analyzed which factors allowed the project to be successful. As a culmination to my research I designed and built a water project that supplied 36 homes and a primary school with potable water. I am still in contact with the village and am part of an organization that raises money to send students to school beyond primary school as well as pay for teachers and many other school necessities.

While I was studying abroad in China, on May 12, 2008 an 8.0-magnitude earthquake struck about 50 miles from where I was living. It left 5.5 million people homeless and killed 90,000. In response to this tragedy a classmate and I founded a relief organization, China Earthquake Aid (CEA), to try and aid the victims. Through CEA we raised $65,000 and completed 3 very successful projects including an eco-friendly sanitation program in the Woolong Nature Preserve.


Cheyenne Sanders, Nominee

Junior, American Indian Studies and Political Science major


2008 - 2009

Sarah Ellison, Scholar

Junior, Environmental Studies and Political Science major


Cecilia Gobin, Scholar

Junior, American Indian Studies major, Anthropology and History minor

I am a Tulalip tribal member. After obtaining my undergraduate I plan on attending Law school, eventually establishing a career as an attorney representing my tribe, Tulalip, or other tribal governments. In my free time I enjoy playing the piano, watching films/movies, spending time with my friends and family, and going to the beach.


Geoffrey Morgan, Honorable Mention

Junior, Civil & Environmental Engineering and International Studies major

I was born and raised on a farm in a small town outside of Seattle called Hobart. There I completed all k-12 scholastic levels in the local school district and graduated with high honors in June 2005 from Tahoma Senior High. After graduating I came to the Honors College at the University of Washington to pursue a degree in Aerospace Engineering. One year into the program I realized that building rockets and spaceships was not going to keep me fulfilled for the rest of my life. I wanted to get out, explore, and help people around the world. To do this I decided to major in Civil and Environmental Engineering and International Studies.

In my third year I decided to study abroad in Chengdu, China. While in China I conducted an independent undergraduate research project in two Yi minority villages on the recent NGO water projects that had been built. I analyzed them to see the effects they had on the villagers’ way of life. I also analyzed which factors allowed the project to be successful. As a culmination to my research I designed and built a water project that supplied 36 homes and a primary school with potable water. I am still in contact with the village and am part of an organization that raises money to send students to school beyond primary school as well as pay for teachers and many other school necessities.

While I was studying abroad in China, on May 12, 2008 an 8.0-magnitude earthquake struck about 50 miles from where I was living. It left 5.5 million people homeless and killed 90,000. In response to this tragedy a classmate and I founded a relief organization, China Earthquake Aid (CEA), to try and aid the victims. Through CEA we raised $65,000 and completed 3 very successful projects including an eco-friendly sanitation program in the Woolong Nature Preserve.

2007 - 2008

Ryan Erickson, Honorable Mention

Earth & Space Sciences major


Cecilia Gobin, Scholar

American Indian Studies major


Donna Neagle, Scholar

Nursing major


Jamie Stroble, Honorable Mention

Environmental Studies and International Studies: Development Track major


Matt Weintraub, Nominee


2006 - 2007

Emma Noyes, Scholar

Junior, Anthropology and Public Health major

Emma Noyes

Emma Noyes, a UW junior, is one of the 80 students from 60 colleges and universities selected as 2007 Udall Scholars. Emma is a double major in Anthropology and Public Health with a focus on Native American and Indigenous issues. A member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, she is pursuing a career in public health with a goal of reducing the vast health disparities experienced in both urban and rural Native American, First Nations, Alaska Native and Indigenous communities.

Emma has been highly active on campus this year as the Vice President of First Nations @UW, the Volunteer Coordinator and Coastal Outreach Representative for the First Nations @UW 36th Annual Spring Powwow, the Vice President of the University of Washington American Indian Science and Engineering Society chapter, and a mentor through the Yehawali Native American Mentoring Program. She was also an Office of Minority Affairs Recruitment and Outreach Student Ambassador, dedicated to encouraging underrepresented students to pursue higher education.

Emma’s other hobbies and activities include journaling, participating in traditional food gathering and cultural celebrations, exploring beaches and tide-pools, painting and other art projects. Her most recent adventure has been joining a Hawaiian paddling group. Emma was awarded a 2007 Bonderman Travel Award and is currently on an eight month solo travel that will take her around the globe.

2005 - 2006

Yvonne Tyler, Nominee

Biology major


2004 - 2005

Kayanna Warren, Scholar

International Studies and History major

Kayanna Warren is working towards a BA in International Studies and a B.S. in Biology – Ecology and Conservation. She desires to work in the international arena addressing global problems. Kayanna wants to determine policy that protects both the environment and social well-being worldwide via reinforcing international cooperation in natural areas and resource protection, sustainable development, and conflict mediation.

Kayanna gained experience in international sustainable development and political economy during her year living in China as a participant in the UW- Sichuan University Exchange Program. She researched the transition of farmers in a poor, remote village to cash cropping and is detailing the effects on the local political economy and natural environment. She is currently writing her Jackson School of International Studies Honors thesis about her research in China.

Kayanna has also been active on and around campus with volunteering for the University Youth Shelter, organizing pro Middle-East-peace events, representing the applied sciences in the ASUW Senate, and engaging in a myriad of other social action and volunteering efforts.She has recently followed up on her previous internship with the Washington Environmental Council, mobilizing UW students to lobby in support of a state bill requiring green building. The bill passed this spring. She plans to participate in a UW Honors program in Rome this summer, and in her spare time, she enjoys cooking experiments, dancing, backpacking, travel, and discussing politics. Kayanna is a member of the UW Women’s Rugby team.

In addition to receiving the Morris K. Udall Scholarship twice, Kayanna received a Mary Gates Research Training Grant for her research in China and is a member of the UW Honors and Jackson School Honors programs. She hopes to pursue a PhD in International Studies, Relations, or Policy.


Sheila Ann Spiker, Nominee


2003 - 2004

Abby Lundstrom, Nominee


Kayanna Warren, Scholar

International Studies and History major

Kayanna Warren is working towards a BA in International Studies and a B.S. in Biology – Ecology and Conservation. She desires to work in the international arena addressing global problems. Kayanna wants to determine policy that protects both the environment and social well-being worldwide via reinforcing international cooperation in natural areas and resource protection, sustainable development, and conflict mediation.

Kayanna gained experience in international sustainable development and political economy during her year living in China as a participant in the UW- Sichuan University Exchange Program. She researched the transition of farmers in a poor, remote village to cash cropping and is detailing the effects on the local political economy and natural environment. She is currently writing her Jackson School of International Studies Honors thesis about her research in China.

Kayanna has also been active on and around campus with volunteering for the University Youth Shelter, organizing pro Middle-East-peace events, representing the applied sciences in the ASUW Senate, and engaging in a myriad of other social action and volunteering efforts.She has recently followed up on her previous internship with the Washington Environmental Council, mobilizing UW students to lobby in support of a state bill requiring green building. The bill passed this spring. She plans to participate in a UW Honors program in Rome this summer, and in her spare time, she enjoys cooking experiments, dancing, backpacking, travel, and discussing politics. Kayanna is a member of the UW Women’s Rugby team.

In addition to receiving the Morris K. Udall Scholarship twice, Kayanna received a Mary Gates Research Training Grant for her research in China and is a member of the UW Honors and Jackson School Honors programs. She hopes to pursue a PhD in International Studies, Relations, or Policy.


Randi Adair, Nominee


2002 - 2003

Leslie McGinnis, Nominee


Megan Matthews, Scholar

English major


2001 - 2002

Allison Van, Scholar

Biology and Community & Environmental Planning (CEP), Program on the Environment major


2000 - 2001

Allison Van, Nominee


Angela Picard, Nominee


Lisa Lurie, Honorable Mention

Program on the Environment major


1998 - 1999

Markus Speidel, Scholar

Biology major